Opioid Facts

Enough opioids were dispensed to Sequoyah County residents for every adult to have the equivalent of 193 hydrocodone 10mg tablets.

EVERY 11 MINUTES SOMEONE DIES FROM AN OPIOID OVERDOSE.

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Unintentional Opioid Overdose Death Rates

by county of residence in Oklahoma | 2012 - 2016

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34 OKLAHOMANS
DIE EVERY MONTH

FROM UNINTENTIONAL PRESCRIPTION OPIOID OVERDOSE

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unintentional prescription drug overdose deaths in Oklahoma involve at least ONE PRESCRIPTION OPIOID.

2000+

OKLAHOMANS DIED of unintentional prescription opioid overdose from the years 2012-2016

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DEATHS FROM UNINTENTIONAL OVERDOSES

SEQUOYAH COUNTY - 2012 TO 2016

ALL UNINTENTIONAL OVERDOSES
50
PRESCRIPTION DRUG OVERDOSES
37
OPIOID OVERDOSES
32
ILLICIT DRUG OVERDOSES
14
ALCOHOL OVERDOSES
5

Opioid Overdose Fast Facts

Sequoyah County Data from 2012 to 2016

  • There were 32 unintentional prescription opioid deaths in Sequoyah County.
  • Sequoyah County had the 11th highest death rate in the state.
  • Males were 98% more likely to die than females.
  • Adults aged 15-54 had the highest rate of death.
  • 50% of people who died had a history of mental health problems.
  • 66% of people who died had a history of substance abuse.
  • Learn the warning signs of an overdose – 91% of deaths occured at a home or apartment.

Non-Opioid Treatments

for chronic pain.

Principles of Chronic Pain Treatment

  • Use non-opioid therapies to the extent possible.
  • Identify and address co-existing mental health conditions.
  • Focus on functional goals and improvement, engaging patients actively in their pain management.
  • Use disease-specific treatments when available.
  • Use first-line medication options preferentially
  • Consider interventional therapies in patients who fail standard non-invasive therapies
  • Use multi-modal approaches, including interdisciplinary rehabilitation for patients who have failed standard treatments, have severe functional deficits, or psychosocial risk factors.

Non-Opioid Medications

Medication Magnitude of Benefits Harms Comments
Acetaminophen
Small
Hepatotoxic, particularly at higher doses
First-line analgesic, probably less effective than NSAIDs
NSAIDs
Small-moderate
Cardiac, GI, renal
First line analgesic, COX-2 selective NSAIDs less GI toxicity
Gabapentin/Pregabalin
Small-moderate
Sedation, dizziness, alaxia
First-line agent for neuropathic pain; pregabalin approved for fibromyalgia
Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and serotonin/ norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)
Small-moderate
TCAs have anticholinergic and cardiac toxicities; SNRIs safer and better tolerated
First-line for neuropathic pain; TCAs and SNRIs for fibromyalgia, TCAs for headaches
Topical agents (lidocaine, capsaicin, NSAIDs)
Small-moderate
Capsaicin initial flare/burning, irritation of mucus membranes
Consider as alternative first-line, thought to be safer than systemic medications. Lidocaine for neuropathic pain, topical NSAIDs for localized osteoarthritis, topical capsaicin for musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain